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Highlights
MEdIES in the GAP Partner Network 1

Neroupoli, the Greek water-city

Latest publication

MARLISCO exhibition

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 Calendar
4/11/2019
13th LTN Conference ‚ÄĚFrom Theory to Action: A Creative Response to ESD
5/2/2019
Global Festival of Action for Sustainable Development, Bonn, 2-4 May 2019
5/2/2019
14 Meeting of the UNECE Steering Committee on ESD, 2-3 May 2019, Geneva
6/26/2019
SAIL for Teachers, 26/6-3/7 2019
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Due to the development of its work in multiple intelligences, this school has organised its curriculum by focusing on students, allowing them greater autonomy in the learning process and greater participation in matters of school organisation thanks to democratic and inclusive management processes.

Authentic problem solving, based in real life contexts, hands-on approaches, the library culture, robotics, enigmatic challenges, meditation... we loved everything about this school.
Inspirational, a must see. What is your favorite practice?
Browse for more here: https://www.woorannaparkps.com.au/
in matters of school organisation thanks to democratic and inclusive
management processes.
authentic problem solving, based in real life contexts, contacts to experts, we loved everything about this school
Browse here: https://www.woorannaparkps.com.au/

 
 
  Posted in ESD News comments  
 
 

UN Environment’s Sixth Global Environmental Outlook (GEO-6) is the most comprehensive assessment of the state of the world's environment. The report also offers a rigorous analysis of our prospects for a healthy future.

What’s the prognosis? Our planet is suffering. The climate is warming, species are going extinct, natural resources are being wasted, and many of our ecosystems are under enormous stress.

But there’s good news too. Hunger is on the decline, innovation is taking off, and people everywhere are seeking out ways to live more sustainably.

Access the GEO-6 in full text and summary version (in many languages) here: https://www.unenvironment.org/resources/global-environment-outlook-6


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  Posted in ESD News comments  
 
 

[What‚Äôs clear to me now is that there won‚Äôt be a single moment when we need to have ‚Äúthe talk‚ÄĚ about climate change. Instead, climate change needs to be something that‚Äôs part of our everyday conversations and actions. It needs to be fun and engaging, solutions-focused, and fact-based. And, above all, it needs to start now. Here are five techniques that can help.]

Recommended article for teachers and parents.

Read more: https://www.yesmagazine.org/planet/talking-to-kids-climate-change-advice-20190307?fbclid=IwAR1cSWXhOhtxTwCHt8grpIBmVlCENVZP7X1cWkVPfH_2ZROTaIbB6tOq8Q4

 
 
  Posted in ESD News comments  
 
 

The updated EAEA manifesto 2019 outlines the challenges where adult education can play a key role, it’s transformative possibilities and the power and joy of learning.

The manifesto is targeted at European, national and regional policy makers to demonstrate the benefits of adult learning. In the upcoming European elections, the manifesto will help communicate EAEA’s vision of a Learning Europe with all necessary skills, knowledge and competences.

EAEA proposes a Europe-wide effort to go one step up, to develop a knowledge society that can deal with the challenges of our time. This demands sustainable investments now ‚Äď on the European, national, regional and local levels in adult education.

The manifesto presents nine current European challenges, which adult learning helps to solve:

  • Active citizenship and democracy
  • Health and well-being
  • Life skills for individuals
  • Social cohesion, equity and equality
  • Employment and work
  • Digitalisation
  • Migration and demographic change
  • Sustainability
  • Adult education and European & international policies

Access the full version (with selected research evidence and best practices) and 1 page version of the Manifersto here: https://eaea.org/our-work/influencing-policy/manifesto-for-adult-learning-in-the-21st-century/?mc_cid=dd9374ece1&mc_eid=0fa958f41b&fbclid=IwAR2rOZAat0MiRCPgZK1PCPGcx2FICL_tuXXN7c_UvXK-rMCN82rJv4aGtYg

 
 
  Posted in ESD News comments  
 
 

The Academic Cooperation Association (ACA) organised succesfully its flagship seminar "What’s new in Brussels? in Brussels 01 February 2019 . Among others, some first updates about the new phase of the ERASMUS Programme (2021- 2027) were presented (we are in a period of related discussions about this) and particuarly, the approach of the Commission’s proposal, promising evolution rather than revolution, after the drastic structural reform which characterised the past reform leading to Erasmus+.

The Commission's proposal foresees roughly a doubling of the budget (compared to the present 7-year period) while the European Parliament demands a trebling!

The report of the ACA event  is now available here

 
 
  Posted in ESD News comments  
 
 

Given the huge challenges the world faces, it is clear that we need to teach, learn and live in a fundamentally different manner. Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) is increasingly recognised as playing a central role in empowering learners of all ages to positively respond to local and global challenges and act in a more peaceful, just, inclusive and sustainable manner. This approach is already helping people develop the skills, values and attitudes necessary to create more resilient societies and transition towards the skilled, green, low-carbon economies of the future.

This handbook explores some of the central success factors in policy, process and practice in some of the pioneering countries and contexts where ESD is being effectively embraced. It examines some of the major trends, case studies and challenges in introducing this more holistic, progressive, hands-on education.

Read more and download the handbook.

 
 
  Posted in ESD News comments  
 
 

UNESCO has shared  a draft framework for ESD beyond 2019 (ESD for 2030) which will be discussed during the upcoming spring session of the UNESCO EB. This document is now available online in all 6 UN official languages. https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000366797

Three messages from the document:

a) Transformative  action:  ESD  has  to  pay  more  attention  to  each  learner’s  individual  transformation processes and how they happen. First, transformation necessitates a certain level of disruption together with courage and determination. Second, there are stages of transformation for the  individual:  with  the  acquisition  of  knowledge,  learners  become  aware  of  certain  realities;  with critical analysis, they begin to understand the complexities of the realities; experiential exposure can lead to an empathic connection to realities; when the realities are relevant to one’s life and through tipping  moments,  compassion  and  solidarity  are  developed.  This  understanding  of  transformation involves  not  only  formal,  but  also  non-formal  and  informal  education;  both  cognitive  and  socio-emotional learning; and community and citizenship education.

b). Structural  changes:  There  is  a  need  for  ESD  to  pay  more  attention  to  the  deep  structural  causes of unsustainable development, in particular the relationship between economic growth and sustainable  development.  ESD  should  promote  development  as  a  balancing  act,  which  implies  adapting  to  changes  while  respecting  the  values  of  conservation,  sufficiency,  moderation  and  solidarity. A structural view is also required to address ESD in contexts of extreme poverty or other challenging survival situations (e.g. conflict or refugee situations), where the full complexity of the concept of sustainable development does not immediately resonate with people trying to survive on a daily basis. In these contexts, ESD should consider people’s specific living conditions and provide them with skills to ensure their livelihood. Above all, it should ensure human dignity and the right to live decently.

c) The technological future: Technological advances may provide solutions to some of the ‚Äúold‚ÄĚ sustainability¬† problems,¬† but¬† some¬† ESD¬† efforts¬† to¬† change¬† people‚Äôs¬† behaviour¬† may¬† no¬† longer¬† be ¬†relevant.¬† However,¬† the¬† technological¬† solutions¬† themselves¬† may¬† bring¬† new¬† challenges¬† or¬† simply ¬†create an illusion of having solved the original problems. ESD and its emphasis on critical thinking is¬† therefore¬† becoming¬† ever¬† more¬† important.¬† For¬† example,¬† with¬† sensor-equipped¬† buildings,¬† the ¬†behaviour of switching off lights to save energy may become extinct, but the value of saving energy should¬† remain¬† relevant.¬† New¬† opportunities¬† will¬† also¬† open ¬†up¬† for¬† ESD,¬† such¬† as¬† accelerating¬† the ¬†transition to green technologies by equipping people with the required green skills. Orienting ESD to support the achievement of the SDGs will provide the opportunity for the ESD community to work more¬† closely ¬†with¬† key¬† technology¬† stakeholders,¬† namely¬† business,¬† manufacturing¬† and¬† enterprise sectors.

Read the Report in English ans 5 more languages here.

 
 
  Posted in ESD News comments  
 
 

  • Decades of research by organizational scientists, psychologists, sociologists, economists and demographers show that socially diverse groups (that is, those with a diversity of race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation) are more innovative than homogeneous groups.
  • It seems obvious that a group of people with diverse individual expertise would be better than a homogeneous group at solving complex, nonroutine problems. It is less obvious that social diversity should work in the same way‚ÄĒyet the science shows that it does.
  • This is not only because people with different backgrounds bring new information. Simply interacting with individuals who are different forces group members to prepare better, to anticipate alternative viewpoints and to expect that reaching consensus will take effort.
  • Read the full article here

 

 
 
  Posted in ESD News comments  
 
 

 

An interactive youth version of the 2019 GEM Report on migration and displacement is now available, featuring videos and case studies bringing to life some of its key recommendations.
Migration, displacement and education: Building bridges, not walls" the new issues of the GEM Report series
The hard data
- 1 in 5 students are first- or second -generation immigrants in rich countries
- The EU Reception Conditions Directive says EU countries have to grant asylum seekers access to the education systems ‚Äėunder similar conditions as nationals‚Äô no more
than three months after their application. In practice, CHILDREN AND YOUTH HAVE WAIT months or years to attend schools
-¬† Studies in high income countries have reported post‚ÄĎtraumatic stress (due to traumatic experiences of violence and conflict) disorder rates ranging from 10% to 25%. In low and middle income countries, rates as high as 75% have been reported.
- International migration mainly affects high income countries, where immigrants make up at least 15% of the student population in half of schools. It also affects sending countries: More than one in four witness at least one-fifth of their skilled nationals emigrating.  Displacement mainly affects low income countries, which host 10% of the global population but 20% of
the global refugee population, often in their most educationally deprived areas. More than half of those forcibly displaced are under age 18.
By examining representative case studies, collecting good and bad practices, story telling through an interactive way - access to intervies, videos, twitter posts, tect.) the report has prepared the following short but quite strong recommendations:
This report makes seven recommendations that support
implementation of the compacts:
‚Ė†‚Ė† Protect the right to education of migrants and
displaced people
‚Ė†‚Ė† Include migrants and displaced people in national
education systems
‚Ė†‚Ė† Understand and plan for the education needs of
migrants and displaced people
‚Ė†‚Ė† Represent migration and displacement histories in
education accurately to challenge prejudices
‚Ė†‚Ė† Prepare teachers of migrants and refugees to address
diversity and hardship
‚Ė†‚Ė† Harness the potential of migrants and
displaced people
‚Ė†‚Ė† Support education needs of migrants and displaced
people in humanitarian and development aid.
Teachers are not counsellors. They need training and support so they can recognise stress and trauma and refer children to specialists.
UNESCO urges teachers to use the Report in classrooms to discuss key issues on migration and displacement around the world, taking each story in turn, discussing the context, the implications and the solutions.
This version will be officially launched later this month at the UN Youth Assembly in New York.
Available at http://gem-report-2019.unesco.org/ and http://gem-report-2019.unesco.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/GEMR_2019-YouthReport-EN_Interactive.pdf


An interactive youth version of the 2019 UNESCO Global Education Monitoring (GEM) Report entitled "Migration, displacement and education: Building bridges, not walls" is now available, featuring a lot of case studies and story-telling. Some hard data included:

- Immigrants make up at least 15% of the student population in half of schools, in high income countries

- More than 1 in 4 witness at least 1/5 of their skilled nationals emigrating, in the sending countries.

- In low income countries, which host 10% of the global population but 20% of the global refugee population (often in the most educationally deprived areas),more than half of those forcibly displaced are under age 18.

- 1 in 5 students are first- or second -generation immigrants in rich countries.

- While in the EU Reception Conditions Directive says that countries have to grant asylum seekers access to the education systems "under similar conditions as nationals"  no more than 3 months after their application, in practice, childern and youth have to wait months or years to attend schools.

-¬† Studies in high-income countries have reported post‚ÄĎtraumatic stress (due to traumatic experiences of violence and conflict) disorder rates ranging from 10% to 25%. In low and middle income countries, rates as high as 75% have been reported.

 

By examining representative case studies, collecting good and bad practices and story telling through an interactive way  (access to intervies, videos, twitter posts, tect.) the report has prepared the following short but straight-forwarded recommendations:

‚Ė† Protect the right to education of migrants and displaced people.

‚Ė† Include migrants and displaced people in national education systems.

‚Ė† Understand and plan for the education needs of migrants and displaced people.

‚Ė† Represent migration and displacement histories in education accurately to challenge prejudices.

‚Ė† Harness the potential of migrants and displaced people

‚Ė† Support education needs of migrants and displaced people in humanitarian and development aid.

‚Ė† Prepare teachers of migrants and refugees to address diversity and hardship. Particularly about trauma: Teachers are not counsellors; They need training and support so they can recognise stress and trauma and refer children to specialists.


UNESCO urges teachers to use the report in their classrooms to discuss key issues on migration and displacement around the world, taking each story in turn, discussing the context, the implications and the solutions.

This version will be officially launched later this month at the UN Youth Assembly in New York.

Access: http://gem-report-2019.unesco.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/GEMR_2019-YouthReport-EN_Interactive.pdf

Read more about this GEM series http://gem-report-2019.unesco.org/

 

 

 
 
  Posted in ESD News comments  
 
 

 

This presentation and fascinating discussion that lasted almost 2hrs, took place on 13/02/2019 in Paris.

It is thought provoking and highly recommended for anyone dealing with the education of children today, icluding parents.

Video in ENGLISH: https://youtu.be/7OBxXE_XabY

Video in FRENCH: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0B0Lh3W-aZQ

 
 
  Posted in ESD News comments  
 
 
 

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